All posts by The Omnivorist

Basic Beef Curry

This is another one of those basic recipes that lends itself well to being tinkered with. I have changed the meat from beef to veal or pork, or the veggies depending on the season (butternut squash in the colder months, eggplant in the summer for example) and the results are practically foolproof since long-simmering stews are very forgiving: if the meat isn’t tender enough, just continue cooking some more. This makes this type of recipe ideal for the slow cooker as well!

Continue reading Basic Beef Curry

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My Real Food Rules

Local butcher shop
Our neighborhood butcher

I recently heard on Balanced Bites (one of my favorite health-themed podcasts) that adopting a new lifestyle and choices takes a good two years to really stick. That made complete sense to me. It was during my first pregnancy that I started to totally geek out on nutrition and health, and it really wasn’t until around the two-year mark that I could say that I had changed my entire diet and lifestyle in a meaningful way. I guess when it comes to making thoughtful food choices there’s nothing more motivating than having a small human developing inside of you! Continue reading My Real Food Rules

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Baby’s first foods

yumurtaI’ve had two close girlfriends who became mothers earlier this year and I had promised them that I would have this blog entry by the time they have to start introducing solids to their little ones. Well the first baby is 5.5 months old right now so I need to get to it!

I guess those know me will not be surprised to hear that I did not much heed mainstream advice when it came to the introduction of solids either (whether it be how things are done in my native Turkey, longtime home United States or my current home, France). I mostly followed the tenets of the Weston A Price Foundation because, once again, it just made sense to me: the idea that what we put into our babies’ mouths determines the strength of their immune systems, this idea of “food as information,” as well as pleasure and comfort and all-around goodness — this is something I can really get behind. Continue reading Baby’s first foods

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Slow Cooker Beef Chocolate Chili

I’d been eyeing a slow cooker for ages and when I recently joined the club of working mothers, I decided it was finally time to invest in one. I am still giddy about my purchase and have been slowly making my way down a long list of recipes that are adapted to my new helper.

So it is that I have happily discovered that a beef chili lends itself quite graciously to being slow-cooked. If you don’t count the bean preparation (which is low on hands-on time, to be fair), this is fairly quick to prep and delicious to come home to. Continue reading Slow Cooker Beef Chocolate Chili

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Parsnip Cardamom Soup

Cardamom is one of those spices that I love having around. I’m a sucker for the light green color of the whole pods and the delicate aroma that goes so well with savory and sweet dishes. And since I don’t always come across recipes that call for it, I jump at the chance to test it when I find one. In this delicate winter soup, the cardamom is a perfect accompaniment to the sweet parsnip.

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Continue reading Parsnip Cardamom Soup

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Apple Butter (lacto-fermentation optional)

This recipe is from Super Nutrition for Babies, The Right Way to Feed Your Baby for Optimal Health, which has been absolutely indispensable in my kitchen especially when introducing solids to my baby.

This is a delicious and easy dessert for the whole family that is without any added sugar, and made all the more nutritious if you also go the extra mile and lacto-ferment it. Since it is so simple to do, I find that it’s a good foray into the world of lacto-fermentation. Continue reading Apple Butter (lacto-fermentation optional)

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Chicken Livers with Onions

If you do an informal survey and ask people (especially the health-conscious) what they think the most nutrient-dense foods for humans on the planet is, you’ll probably get something along the lines of kale, blueberries or beets. They are absolutely right that those things are very good for you, and delicious, and an indispensable part of any healthful diet but how to tell them that, um, that ain’t half the story? Continue reading Chicken Livers with Onions

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Coconut Curry Pork

This is a really simple recipe that fills the house with yummy smells. It’s also endlessly modifiable – you can swap out the meat (beef, veal and chicken all work as well) or the spices or even omit the tomato sauce and just make it with coconut milk and extra broth. The only trick is to have a good heavy pot (cast-iron is best) and leave on a low flame for a while. As always with this type of dish, it tastes even better reheated the next day. I like to make this on a Sunday for a quick weekday dinner. Continue reading Coconut Curry Pork

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Easy pie crust

200g flour

50g butter

Pinch of salt or sugar depending on your final dish

8 tbsp water

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Heat the butter and water in a saucepan. Turn off the heat when the butter has melted.

Add all the flour at once and stir with a wooden spoon until the dough is uniform.

Place the dough in the middle of a pie tart and spread evenly with your hands.

Keep in the fridge for at least half an hour before blind-baking.

There. Can you really say that making a tart crust is really complicated and time-consuming now?

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